Goals and Systems

Happy 2015!  This time last year I wrote about the importance of setting goals.  As I reviewed my goals from 2014, I achieved about 60% of them.  I could not help but feel like a bit of a failure for not accomplishing what I had set out to do, and then I can across an article about the difference between setting goals and systems; the article struck a chord with me.  I have condensed it below, but this year I will make it a point to set goals and have the systems behind them to help guild me towards the finish line!  After all, that's why we set goals - to improve - right? Here is to a wonderful 2015!

"What's the difference between goals and systems?"

  • If you're a coach, and your goal is to win a championship. Your system is what your team does at practice each day.
  • If you're a runner, and your goal is to run a marathon. Your system is your training schedule for the month.
  • If you're an entrepreneur, and your goal is to build a million dollar business. Your system is your sales and marketing process. 

Now for the really interesting question:
If you completely ignored your goals and focused only on your system, would you still get results?

For example, if you were a coach and you ignored your goal to win a championship and focused only on what your team does at practice each day, would you still get results?

Let's explore the benefits of focusing on systems instead of goals.

1. Goals reduce your current happiness.

When you're working toward a goal, you are essentially saying, "I'm not good enough yet, but I will be when I reach my goal." The problem with this mindset is that you're teaching yourself to always put happiness and success off until the next milestone is achieved. "Once I reach my goal, then I'll be happy. Once I achieve my goal, then I'll be successful."

SOLUTION: Commit to a process, not a goal. Choosing a goal puts a huge burden on your shoulders. But we do this to ourselves all the time. We place unnecessary stress on ourselves to lose weight or to succeed in business or to write a best-selling novel. Instead, you can keep things simple and reduce stress by focusing on the daily process and sticking to your schedule, rather than worrying about the big, life-changing goals. When you focus on the practice instead of the performance, you can enjoy the present moment and improve at the same time.

2. Goals are strangely at odds with long-term progress.

You might think your goal will keep you motivated over the long-term, but that's not always true. Consider someone training for a half-marathon. Many people will work hard for months, but as soon as they finish the race, they stop training. Their goal was to finish the half-marathon and now that they have completed it, that goal is no longer there to motivate them. When all of your hard work is focused on a particular goal, what is left to push you forward after you achieve it? This can create a type of "yo-yo effect" where people go back and forth from working on a goal to not working on one. This type of cycle makes it difficult to build upon your progress for the long-term.

SOLUTION: Release the need for immediate results. I was training at the gym last week and I was doing my second-to-last set of clean and jerks. When I hit that rep, I felt a small twinge in my leg. It wasn't painful or an injury, just a sign of fatigue near the end of my workout. For a minute or two, I thought about doing my final set. Then, I reminded myself that I plan to do this for the rest of my life and decided to call it a day. In a situation like the one above, a goal-based mentality will tell you to finish the workout and reach your goal. After all, if you set a goal and you don't reach it, then you feel like a failure. But with a systems-based mentality, I had no trouble moving on. Systems-based thinking is never about hitting a particular number, it's about sticking to the process and not missing workouts. Of course, I know that if I never miss a workout, then I will lift bigger weights in the long-run. And that's why systems are more valuable than goals. Goals are about the short-term result. Systems are about the long-term process. In the end, process always wins.

3. Goals suggest that you can control things that you have no control over.

You can't predict the future. (I know, shocking.) But every time we set a goal, we try to do it. We try to plan out where we will be and when we will make it there. We try to predict how quickly we can make progress, even though we have no idea what circumstances or situations will arise along the way.

SOLUTION: Build feedback loops. Each Friday, I spend 15 minutes filling out a small spreadsheet with the most critical metrics for my business. Feedback loops are important for building good systems because they allow you to keep track of many different pieces without feeling the pressure to predict what is going to happen with everything. Forget about predicting the future and build a system that can signal when you need to make adjustments.

Fall In Love With Systems

None of this is to say that goals are useless. However, I've found that goals are good for planning your progress and systems are good for actually making progress. Goals can provide direction and even push you forward in the short-term, but eventually a well-designed system will always win. Having a system is what matters. Committing to the process is what makes the difference.  

This article was written by James Clear and modified for this article.
To view his full article please click this link: http://jamesclear.com/goals-systems